Distomatosis hepatica pdf

 

    La Distomatosis Hepatica en Cuba [Hepatic Distomatosis in Cuba]. ‹ PREV ARTICLE · This This content is PDF only. Please click on the PDF icon to access. Fasciolosis is a zoonosis affecting ruminants, caused by the liver flukes Fasciola (F.) hepatica, and F. gigantica, which infect at least million people worldwide. Die Fasziolose ist eine Plattwurminfektion von Wiederkäuern, die durch Fasciola (F.) hepatica, und F. gigantica. PDF | The trematodes Fasciola spp. and Dicrocoelium dendriticum are by F. hepatica in Khuzestangigantica were involved in distomatosis.

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    Distomatosis Hepatica Pdf

    INTRODUCTION. Fasciolosis also known as Fascioliasis, Distomatosis and liver Rot is an important disease of cattle caused by trematodes i.e Fasciola hepatica. La distomatosis hepatica en Cuba. JAMA. Download the PDF to view the article, as well as its associated figures and tables. Abstract. This is a. whether redial burden and shedding of F. hepatica cercariae vary when the . cercaria production of F. hepatica from thèse snails trained for distomatosis.

    Mechanism[ edit ] The development of infection in definitive host is divided into two phases: the parenchymal migratory phase and the biliary phase. After the penetration of the intestine, flukes migrate within the abdominal cavity and penetrate the liver or other organs. The second phase the biliary phase begins when parasites enter the biliary ducts of the liver. In biliary ducts, flukes mature, feed on blood, and produce eggs. Hypertrophy of biliar ducts associated with obstruction of the lumen occurs as a result of tissue damage. Resistance to infection[ edit ] Mechanisms of resistance have been studied by several authors in different animal species. These studies may help to better understand the immune response to F. It has been established that cattle acquire resistance to challenge infection with F. In addition antibody concentration quickly drops post treatment and no antibodies are present one year after treatment, which makes it a very good diagnostic method. Coprological examinations of stool alone are generally not adequate because infected humans have important clinical presentations long before eggs are found in the stools. Moreover, in many human infections, the fluke eggs are often not found in the faeces, even after multiple faecal examinations. These immunological tests are based on detection of species-specific antibodies from sera. In addition, biochemical and haematological examinations of human sera support the exact diagnosis eosinophilia, elevation of liver enzymes. Ultrasonography and xray of the abdominal cavity, biopsy of liver, and gallbladder punctuate can also be used ref: US-guided gallbladder aspiration: a new diagnostic method for biliary fascioliasis.

    Author summary Fascioliasis is a highly pathogenic zoonotic disease emerging in recent decades, in part due to the effects of climate and global changes. South America is the continent presenting more numerous human fascioliasis endemic areas and the highest Fasciola hepatica infection prevalences and intensities known in humans. These serious public health scenarios appear mainly linked to altitude areas in Andean countries, whereas lowland areas of non-Andean countries, such as Uruguay, only show sporadic human cases or outbreaks.

    To understand this difference, we characterized F. Results indicate that vectors belong to Lymnaea neotropica instead of to Lymnaea viator, as always reported from Uruguay.

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    Our correlation of fasciolid and lymnaeid haplotypes with historical data on the introduction and spread of livestock species into Uruguay allow to understand the molecular diversity detected. We study the life cycle and transmission features of F.

    Results demonstrate that although L. On this baseline, we review the human fascioliasis cases reported in Uruguay and analyze the present and future risk of human infection in front of future climate change estimations. Introduction The impact of climate change and global change is putting trematodiases in one of the main focuses of infectious disease actuality [ 1 — 4 ].

    La distomatosis hepatica en Cuba.

    Among the food-borne trematodiases emphasized in the recent WHO Roadmap for neglected tropical diseases [ 5 ], fascioliasis depicts a specific place due to its worldwide distribution, emergence, and estimated 17 million people infected throughout [ 6 ].

    The climate change impact on fascioliasis is linked to the high dependence of both fasciolid larval stages and their freshwater lymnaeid snail vectors on climatic and environmental characteristics [ 2 , 7 , 8 ].

    Fascioliasis morbidity in humans has been highlighted by the World Health Organization [ 12 ].

    The acute and long-term chronic phases of this disease show high pathogenicity and immunosuppressive capacity [ 13 — 17 ]. Aspects adding concern are the clinical complexity and severity of symptoms and syndromes, important sequelae and even death [ 18 ], pronounced diagnosis difficulties [ 19 ] and treatment problems [ 20 ].

    La distomatosis hepatica en Cuba. | JAMA | JAMA Network

    South America stands out due to the high human prevalences and intensities reported in Andean countries as Bolivia [ 21 — 25 ], Peru [ 26 — 28 ] and Chile [ 29 , 30 ], and the cases from Ecuador [ 31 ], Colombia [ 32 ], and Venezuela [ 33 ].

    Our correlation of fasciolid and lymnaeid haplotypes with historical data on the introduction and spread of livestock species into Uruguay allow to understand the molecular diversity detected. We study the life cycle and transmission features of F. Results demonstrate that although L.

    [Distomatosis: diagnosis and treatment].

    On this baseline, we review the human fascioliasis cases reported in Uruguay and analyze the present and future risk of human infection in front of future climate change estimations. Introduction The impact of climate change and global change is putting trematodiases in one of the main focuses of infectious disease actuality [ 1 — 4 ].

    Among the food-borne trematodiases emphasized in the recent WHO Roadmap for neglected tropical diseases [ 5 ], fascioliasis depicts a specific place due to its worldwide distribution, emergence, and estimated 17 million people infected throughout [ 6 ]. The climate change impact on fascioliasis is linked to the high dependence of both fasciolid larval stages and their freshwater lymnaeid snail vectors on climatic and environmental characteristics [ 2 , 7 , 8 ].

    Fascioliasis morbidity in humans has been highlighted by the World Health Organization [ 12 ].

    The acute and long-term chronic phases of this disease show high pathogenicity and immunosuppressive capacity [ 13 — 17 ]. Aspects adding concern are the clinical complexity and severity of symptoms and syndromes, important sequelae and even death [ 18 ], pronounced diagnosis difficulties [ 19 ] and treatment problems [ 20 ].

    South America stands out due to the high human prevalences and intensities reported in Andean countries as Bolivia [ 21 — 25 ], Peru [ 26 — 28 ] and Chile [ 29 , 30 ], and the cases from Ecuador [ 31 ], Colombia [ 32 ], and Venezuela [ 33 ].

    However, in the non-Andean, lowland countries, human reports only concern sporadic and isolated cases, such as in Brazil [ 34 ] and Uruguay [ 35 ]. Cattle and sheep are the most affected, which is related to mixed grazing [ 37 ], with high prevalences [ 37 — 41 ] and great impact and economic losses [ 42 ].

    Horses, sharing the same pastures with cattle and sheep, are the third affected species [ 43 , 44 ]. The liver fluke also infects wild rodents, including the capybara Hydrochoerus hydrochaeris Caviidae [ 45 ] and the nutria or river rat Myocastor coypus Myocastoridae [ 46 ].

    Fasciolid eggs have also been found in the wild Pampas deer Ozotoceros bezoarticus Cervidae [ 47 ].